books

Magic in the Headlines

Aurora Jane "AJ" Marshall has wanted to be a reporter from the day she first sat on her father's lap reading the headlines. The 1920s are supposed to be all about freedom, and women are flaunting their independence as voting flappers who drive cars and smoke cigarettes. Well, AJ can't smoke because of her asthma,… Continue reading Magic in the Headlines

history

Would this Kill Me in the 1800s: Nystagmus

We're doing something a little different this time around on WTKM. I'd be willing to bet that most of you have never heard the word nystagmus before, so let me break things down a little. Nystagmus is an involuntary, rapid eye movement. It can be caused by several things, including drug overdoses and head injuries,… Continue reading Would this Kill Me in the 1800s: Nystagmus

history

Women’s History Month: Queen Liliuokalani

I came to the realization recently that all of my historical profiles have been of white women, so for the month of March, in honor of Women's History Month, I'll be profiling women of diverse backgrounds. Obviously, I can't touch on every possible nationality or marginalization in the time I have, but I will be… Continue reading Women’s History Month: Queen Liliuokalani

history

The Black Hand in America

Before the mafia, there was the Black Hand, the deadliest secret society you've probably never heard of. Now, before we get started, I do want to clarify something. There are two groups known as "The Black Hand." The first is a proto-mafia group known for extortion, kidnapping, and bombings, particularly in New York, from the… Continue reading The Black Hand in America

art history, history

Women’s History Month: Miné Okubo

I came to the realization recently that all of my historical profiles have been of white women, so for the month of March, in honor of Women's History Month, I'll be profiling women of diverse backgrounds. Obviously, I can't touch on every possible nationality or marginalization in the time I have, but I will be… Continue reading Women’s History Month: Miné Okubo

admin

Passing Bullets

It's been a busy week and I'm currently bogged down with research and editing. Normal posts to resume on Monday. New book announcement next week!I'm currently seeking beta readers and reviewers. Beta readers are advanced readers who help in the editing process by providing opinions of current drafts. There are currently 2 gothic tales on… Continue reading Passing Bullets

history

Women’s History Month: Nanye-hi

I came to the realization recently that all of my historical profiles have been of white women, so for the month of March, in honor of Women's History Month, I'll be profiling women of diverse backgrounds. Obviously, I can't touch on every possible nationality or marginalization in the time I have, but I will be… Continue reading Women’s History Month: Nanye-hi

history

Cotton in the Civil War

Many of us, particularly in the North, like to think that when America gets involved in a conflict, especially on it's own terf, that it's a just war, a righteous conflict. But the truth is, most of the conflict we've fought in the past 243 years have been for economic reasons: tariffs and taxes, access… Continue reading Cotton in the Civil War

finished objects

Finished Objects

Why yes, my proper sock needles finally arrived. I finished these almost immediately after tearing open the package. They're just a plain vanilla sock, top down, out of Tsuki Mountain Fibers in Guardian. There's really not much else to say about these. The construction is super basic, but the yarn has purple, black, blue, pink,… Continue reading Finished Objects

history

Would This Kill Me in the 1800s: Yellow Fever

Yellow fever is one of those "old timey" diseases I've been aware of since I was a kid--not just because I read a lot of historical fiction as a kid, but also because I grew up in mosquito country. But knowing it exists isn't the same as knowing what it does. So what is yellow… Continue reading Would This Kill Me in the 1800s: Yellow Fever